Caloscypha fulgens (Pers. ) Boud.
  Ascomycota   Caloscyphaceae   Caloscypha

Caloscypha fulgens
© Copyright Malcolm Storey 2011-2118 · 3
Caloscypha fulgens

Click on map or images to enlarge.
 
Caloscypha fulgens
© Copyright Malcolm Storey 2011-2118 · 3
Caloscypha fulgens

Caloscypha fulgens
© Copyright Malcolm Storey 2011-2118 · 3
Caloscypha fulgens

Caloscypha fulgens
© Copyright Malcolm Storey 2011-2118 · 3
Caloscypha fulgens

Caloscypha fulgens
© Copyright Malcolm Storey 2011-2118 · 3
Caloscypha fulgens

Caloscypha fulgens
© Copyright Malcolm Storey 2011-2118 · 3
Caloscypha fulgens
21 thumbnails  •  slide show
IDnature guides
Supported by
Hosts · map
FamilyScientific name @ source (records)
_  Substrate @ BPI (17)

Following modified from MushroomObserver.org
   
Top | See original

&pull 20q v5.145 20180528: Error 301 Moved Permanently http://mushroomobserver.org/name/show_name/332

Following modified from MykoWeb
   
Top | See original

California Fungi—Caloscypha fulgens Caloscypha fulgens
(Photo: © Michael Wood)

Caloscypha fulgens (Persoon) Boud.
Bull. Soc. mycol. Fr. 1: 103. 1885.

Common Name: none

  • Sporocarp

    Fruiting body 0.5-3.5 (5.0) cm broad, cupulate, elongate, to variously lobed, sometimes nearly flat in age, sessile to short stipitate; margin incurved, then straight, even to eroded; exterior surface dull yellow to yellowish-orange, bruising bluish-green to olive, especially near the margin; hymenial surface yellow-orange to orange, glabrous.

  • Spores

    Spores 5.5-7.5 µm, globose, smooth, hyaline; spores whitish in deposit.

  • Habitat

    Scattered, gregarious to clustered on needle mats during the spring in the Sierra and higher elevations of the Coast Range; common in most years.

  • Edibility

    Unknown; insignificant.

  • Comments

    A snowbank fungus, Caloscypha fulgens is distinguished by its yellowish-orange, variously-shaped cups which discolor bluish-green with handling or age. It resembles Aleuria aurantia , the Orange Peel Fungus, but the latter lacks a bluing reaction and typically fruits in the fall. White forms, but still bluing, are occasionally encountered. This is one of a number of Ascomycetes used by morel hunters as an indicator species.

  • References

    Arora, D. (1986). Mushrooms Demystified. Ten Speed Press: Berkeley, CA. 959 p.
    Beug, M.W., Bessette, A.E. & Bessette, A.R. (2014). Ascomycete Fungi of North America. University of Texas Press: Austin, TX. 488 p.
    Breitenbach, J. & Kränzlin, F. (1984). Fungi of Switzerland. Volume 1: Ascomycetes. Verlag Mykologia: Luzern, Switzerland. 310 p.
    Dennis, R. W. G. (1981). British Ascomycetes. J. Cramer: Vaduz, Liechtenstein. 585 p.
    Desjardin, D.E., Wood, M.G. & Stevens, F.A. (2015). California Mushrooms: The Comprehensive Identification Guide. Timber Press: Portland, OR. 560 p.
    Medardi, G. (2006). Ascomiceti d'Italia. Centro Studi Micologici: Trento. 454 p.
    Smith, A.H. (1949). Mushrooms in their Natural Habitats. Sawyer's Inc: Portland, OR. 626 p.
    Tylutki, E.E. (1979). Mushrooms of Idaho and the Pacific Northwest: Discomycetes. University of Idaho Press: Moscow, ID. 133 p.

  • Other Descriptions and Photos Main Photo

    (D=Description; I=Illustration; P=Photo; CP=Color Photo)

The Fungi of California
Copyright © 2001-2020 Michael Wood & Fred Stevens
A MykoWeb Page

Links

Updated: 2020-11-30 08:57:36 gmt
Discover Life | Top
© Designed by The Polistes Corporation