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    © Copyright Alan Cressler 2011

    I_AMC9650
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    Rocky Mount_Overlook, _view_looking_northwest, _Skyline_Drive, _Shenandoah_National_Park, _Rockingham_County, _Virginia_1, I_AMC9649
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    Rocky Mount Overlook, view looking northwest, Skyline Drive, Shenandoah National Park, Rockingham County, Virginia 1

    title ???    Rubus idaeus
              images · map




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    determined by who email yyyymmdd
    -1 _grade ???


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    This is one of many views along the Skyline Parkway. caption


    http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4079/4909565635_bc809acde0_o.jpg _private_slide


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    http://www.flickr.com/photos/alan_cressler/4909565635 Flickr source_URL


    Rubus idaeus ssp. strigosus Rubus strigosus, Loft Mountain Campground, Big Flat Mountain, Shenandoah National Park, Albemarle County, Virginia 1 _Flickr title


    plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=RUIDS2
    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rubus_strigosus

    This raspberry was very common around the Loft Mountain Campground. Manuel and I wondered why. We speculated that most people thought they were unripened black berries. Indeed that was true when one of our friends confirmed he thought they were unripened black berries. I knew better and picked a bowl full. They were a tasty addition on my peanut butter and honey sandwiches.">Best as we can tell this is the native American red raspberry. For more information: plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=RUIDS2
    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rubus_strigosus

    This raspberry was very common around the Loft Mountain Campground. Manuel and I wondered why. We speculated that most people thought they were unripened black berries. Indeed that was true when one of our friends confirmed he thought they were unripened black berries. I knew better and picked a bowl full. They were a tasty addition on my peanut butter and honey sandwiches.

    _Flickr description


    _end


    Updated: 2020-07-11 02:30:29 gmt

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